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Soft wash seminar - Virtual

Chemcial ratios - Common Surfaces

On May 16th at 3pm EST via Facebook.com/dirtkiller we had have a LIVE STREAMING seminar about soft wash chemicals, ratios and common surfaces.  The recorded video and transcript are below.

 
 

Watch on YouTube | Vimeo | Facebook

Josh Lee

There it is everybody. This is the original Josh and old man wags back with Dirt Killer pressure washers. And today we're going over a soft wash seminar to look at a couple of different chemicals that are used for common cleaning applications. We're going to discuss some some generic or general mixing recommendations. Of course, everybody knows that, you know, each cleaning application will vary a little bit from time to time, but I want to give you a, you know, lay down a foundation of normal mix ratios. So I'm going to turn it over to Wags and we'll go from there.

Josh Wagner

All right, so thank you guys. Everybody that's listening live. We appreciate the audience. What we're going to do is like I said, gonna go through the chemistry of cleaning some things. At the end of our seminar we are going to ask a question. If you get the question right, you're going to receive a free thing, a chemical. And then after that we are going to open up the entire seminar to Q and A through Facebook, I believe. Yep. So not just questions about the seminar or anything you guys want to ask, that's industry related. We will go ahead and try to answer them for you. So to kind of get us started, we are going to look at the different types of cleaners and some of the roles that each one of them actually plays. This will be a recap from one of our other seminars, but really you got three different types of cleaning chemicals in the industry and I'll kind of let Lee take it away on that.

Josh Lee

So the ones that we're going to take a look at today we're going to kind of break things down into three separate groups. We've got our sanitizers, degreasers and acids. So sanitizers, those are for attacking organic growth, you know, your algae, bacteria, Moss, those sorts of things that are growing on certain types of surfaces. Degreasers that are detergents that break down certain types of soil on the surface and also tried to emulsify and those also have our surfactants to help carry, you know, break the surface tension of the water and carry the material away from the surface. And then we have acids which are used for breaking down the surface that a particular material is stuck to so that we can release a stain. So we really wanted to try to make an emphasis on the fact that, you know, a lot of our strong chemicals get the general misnomer of you know, what's that acid you use for cleaning kitchens?

Josh Lee

Hunting duct, Bitchin' Kitchen. They're not really an acid. They just get that kind of connotation or a connotation because they're super duper strong, but really the, you know, acid and degreaser degreasers usually your alkaline cleaners. So we're looking at different sides of the pH scale and how they behave with certain cleaning applications. Anything to add to that, to kind of touch on what we're going to talk about when it comes to sanitizers, one of the most popular ones in the industry is going to be sodium hypochlorite followed by a certain peroxides or some of

Josh Wagner

The milder acids that Josh was talking about. And then when it comes to degreasers like you said, there's the really aggressive high pH levels that are gonna be your alkalines. Like we got Bitchin' Kitchen, Nastee, Big Green Bruce, I'm sorry, he actually falls in a little milder. But then we also have stuff that is a little more delicate, little easier on the surface and we're looking at things like the Big Green Bruce. We got Boss, we've got Orange Potion, things that are a little softer to work with, Power Bolt too. It's actually a really good one for that. And then when it comes to the acids, the one that we're going to kind of touch on is hydrofluoric acid or ammonium bifluoride. Muriatic acid was exceptionally popular back in the day, but that's kind of starting to get phased out just cause of the, some of the dangers that are associated with it. So kind of keeping all that in mind. That's where our train of thought is going to go with this. But let's go on to our first topic of the seminar and we're going to talk about vinyl surfaces. So you want to take this one?

Josh Lee

Huh?

Josh Wagner

He's having some technical difficulties. So the internet thing, he's trying to see if we're actually live.

Josh Lee

So, vinyl siding of course is a relatively easy surface to clean and that has to do with the type of material that it's made out. Of course, vinyl, plastic and also the porosity of the surface, which is how many little pores and holes that it has. So vinyl is designed to be resistant to things attaching to it. And but there are, there are still little pores that you know, your live agents get stuck to where your atmospheric hydrocarbon stuff from like car exhausts and you know, airplanes, that kind of stuff. Those get stuck in there and that's what gives you the faded dirty look. So usually with, with vinyl, you know, high pH cleaners were always the most popular, but we found over the years that you don't really have to put a super strong high pH cleaner on vinyl siding at a very high concentration to get it clean.

Josh Lee

You do want it to be there, but you know, your your sanitizer, your bleach is not only helping to clean the surface, but it's killing all the other things that, you know, you're, you're battling two different compounds here. You've got the self that's living on the surface as well as the dirt. So that's why you're using a two part solution of your sodium hypochlorite, your bleach and your Boss. Very most common mixture that we promote is bleach and Boss. You get your pH as well as your surfactant your foaming and your emulsification from the detergent and that's what's gonna help to break the stuff down and carry it away from the surface. But there's a harmony there. You want to get that mix mixture, right. So,

Josh Wagner (05:53):

So some of the things that a lot of guys ask us is why we recommend now, and one of the reasons that I personally liked that it's a sodium metasilicate base and the foamy additive Josh was talking about, it's not a real heavy sud. So between those two properties, when you mix it with the hypochlorite and you're putting it on the surface, it'll lay a nice even sud across the entire surface. But the most important part to me in that mix is that it dissipates quickly when you're cleaning houses or cleaning vertical surfaces. When the sun disappears and you know, you're getting ready to rinse, the less sun you have on the surface, the easier it is to get everything off of the surface. If you're laying something with too heavy of a sud, you can spend all day, rinse it and still accomplish the exact same result that you would with something like this.Between that one and Big Green Bruce, one of the reasons that we like them is they're both so mild in how they attack the surface that they're actually considered more of our ecofriendly products. They're a little safer for the skin. They're a little safer to deal with and in the scheme of things are less aggressive than some of the other products that we use. We have a lot of guys that like to use another product that we call Hell Bender. We have another one of them. That's also called Berserker. They're both solid products. They are a little bit higher on the pH scale. They're a lot more alkaline than everything else and those are more aggressive cleaning. As we move into our, our next one that we're going to, it is stucco. Those two kind of become a little bit more popular there because when we're cleaning vinyl surfaces, even though you're letting the hypochlorite do the work, you're only really targeting and end ratio of a 0.3 to a 1% mix of hypochlorite on the surface.Well as soon as you jump up to something like stucco or brick, which we're gonna talk about in a minute, the stucco because of how porous it is and how, I mean basically how bumpy it is, everything sticks there. So by going with something a little more aggressive up in your mix from that, instead of that 0.3% that we were talking about, you can go all the way up to you know, starting with a 0.5% mix up to a one or 1.2% mix. That's going to basically give you the overall clean. It's going to look a lot deeper. It's going to be easier and you don't have to work as hard from the contractor's perspective. When you're using those kinds of detergents and you're, you're throwing things up there, your Boss, your Big Green Bruce because of the chemical base that they are, they leave certain surfaces looking nicer than others.

And what I mean by that is when you throw things on the surface, like glass or any kind of metal trim work where you got door knobs, you got door knockers, stuff like that. It leaves it with a little bit higher of a gloss mean. It's not as aggressive one, say the vinyl or the stucco or the actual surface that you're cleaning, but it leaves a nicer finish on some of these other surfaces that around the home that kind of make things pop. And then jumping up to the aggressive things like Hell Bender / Berserker, they'll actually do the maximum lifting from the surface itself to really go through everything.

Josh Lee

So just to jump on some of the comments, Jason Endsley's asking the mixture for the, the Boss or we're gonna focus on mixtures.

Josh Wagner

I mean, we can talk about them as we go. So when you're mixing Boss' in with the hypochlorite solution you want your end ratio to be in the 0.03 to 0.05. What does that mean? Roughly. You want one cap full per gallon of hypochlorite that you're using. That's kind of a rough ballpark. It's really the same for a lot of these that you're using for just general purpose house washing because you only need so much of it to do the job and anything that you're going beyond that, you're really just wasting the chemical as you're going through it because it's only going to clean so much. It's only going to do so much onto the surface.

Josh Lee

So for just to put it in a more specific range, your 3% ratio was it 0.3 or 3%?

Josh Wagner

0.3 for The Boss, 3% for the bleach point,

Josh Lee

So, 3% of The Boss. Pardon?

Josh Wagner

I'm saying this wrong. Sorry. Alright, 0.03 for The Boss. When you're hitting the surface, that's kind of where your target wants to be. The hypochlorite solution, your starting ratio should be the 0.3 and that just kind of gradually goes up from there.

Josh Lee

So 0.3 times in ounces is about a third of an ounce. So cap full is what he was talking about. So that's, that's about the ratio. And of course that is your starting ratio because in certain applications you're going to find that that adding more of the Boss is going, that is the Boss, right? Yeah. Adding more of the Boss is going to give you a better performance in, in certain cases. So what, what's your max and that you're recommending as far as adding how many ounces of this are we going to be getting into our 5 gallon container.

Josh Wagner

And really there no max on them. For all of them it's kind of going to be something that it's tuned to your rig and how you're doing different cleaning tasks. But I mean there's some guys that in a five gallon bucket, if they're downstreaming, I mean they'll put a half a gallon of that in with three and a half gallons of bleach and then top it off with water and they're using it because they want it to act as more of a surfactant in that case. And if the surface for some reason is absolutely trashed they'll use that to kind of like he said earlier, emulsify some of the dirt and it'll pull it away from the surface a little better. Alright.

Josh Lee

Where are we going next? So we talked about the stucco and drive it. Of course. Some of these mixtures are gonna work well for the, for the just the general cleaning though, we're, we're not taking on any staining off of the surface. And then you know, especially if it's something metallic staining, you know, Rust and that kind of thing. So we're going to touch on that a little bit later. So the next surface that we were going to talk about is asphalt shingles. So asphalt shingles is a very, you know, as another characteristic, you know, versus the, the vinyl siding, the, the asphalt shingles are almost a good surface for things to grow. So the main thing that we're seeing on the surface is cyanobacteria. So you're getting some glowing on growing on the surface your, your moss and that sort of thing.And the reason it's growing there is because you basically got a flower pot for it to grow into. So you're really trying to kill that. So you're gonna use a stronger mixture of sodium hypochlorite but you have to be careful what kind of detergent you add to it to get your foaming-ness or your bubbles. And this is where a surfactant is, is most common term that everybody ad believes that you're adding to the bleach. But it's really a foaming agent. And that foaming agent also behaves as a surfactant. It allows the water to you know, it breaks the surface tension of the water molecules, makes it lay out flatter and it keeps it staying there. You'll find that those types of things are going to grow on your North side of the building, the area that gets the least amount of sun. And especially around here in Maryland, you'll know that the more trees the worst that it is. You know, you want to talk about the mixtures.

Josh Wagner

Yeah. So something that's different about roof cleaning than just about any other task. Roof cleaning or sorry, specifically asphalt shingles, if you put a degreaser on them. And that's really any degreaser because the shingle is oil-based. If you put something on there that's designed to lift oils or degrees, in this case, it can actually deteriorate the shingle too. Because of that. Instead of using something like Boss or Hell Bender or really any of the degrees that we carry, we've got a product it's called Maximus. Foam has absolutely no cleaning properties whatsoever, but it's designed to lay a you right there. It's designed to lay as thick of a sud as possible. Where that kind of comes into play is everything that's growing on the roof. You've got your organic bacterial growth, you got your moss, you got your lichen, you got your algae Gloeocapsa magma, all that stuff that's, we're there to get it off. The only thing you need is a hypochlorite solution. So where your, your siding and your stucco and that stuff, you're, you're aiming for a lot lower of a mix on something like a roof mix. You're looking for an end ratio of somewhere between 2% and 5%. Hypochlorite to actually be hitting the surface at 5%. A lot of you guys are gonna say, well that's a really hot mix and, and it is, but there are certain instances where you need it to get that hot. Cause a lot of these, you know, it's a general rule of thumb, you kind of got to play with them, but when it comes to roof cleaning, as long as you're not running off and killing plants, the roof can take as much as you want to put on it. So unless you're truly wasting chemical and just flooding the surface, it doesn't, it almost doesn't matter how aggressive you go with it. As long as you're keeping in mind that you're trying not to kill anything that's growing on the ground. And like, yeah,

Michael Zittel (Off Camera)

If you're, if there a lot of material, a lot of plant life around the house, the shrubs and so forth, would you cover those? If you're going to do a roof, the heavy hot mix?

Josh Wagner

Yeah. So I don't know if you can hear him. He doesn't have a mic on. The question was asked, if you laid too hot of a mix, do you have to worry about any of the surrounding vegetation? So yes, you do because that stuff's designed to target organic growth. What's the definition of organic growth? Not only does that mean Josh, none of that does that mean me, but that also means plants that are around you and some people.

Josh Lee

Anything with carbon or hydrogen molecules.

Josh Wagner

Yeah. So to protect them, you got a couple of different choices. You can use something that's called Sodium Metabisulfite. It's a it's a neutralizer for bleach. It basically pulls all the activeness of bleach out of it so that everything that runs off is neutralized. The other thing you can do is there's a lot of the guys that use lime to put it around the surf, not around surface, around like the dirt that's around vegetation or just constantly having a guy watering. And in both of those cases, having a guy watering is almost required. Another reason I like telling people to have for roof cleaning is if you're on the roof and you fall off, there's guy watering, he can call 911 for you. If you're working by yourself, you don't really have that option. But as far as covering plants go unless less there in a way that the gutters like bleeding right onto it or the gutter is dumping literally right into the tree or something. Just water on down and lay on some neutralizing product around them that that's more than enough for what a lot of guys.

Josh Lee

Of course the solution to pollution is dilution. So you have to rinse before, during and after these applications and be conscious of that. You can always use plastic but you know, there's other side effects to using Plastic.

Josh Wagner

So our next surface that we're going to kind of touch on is stone concrete and walkways. And this one kind of gets split into two categories. You've got residential cleaning and then you got commercial cleaning when it comes to residential cleaning you know, sidewalks, patios, retaining walls. A lot of what you're seeing, again, is just organic growth. The other stuff that you have to deal with on the commercial side of things is you're actually cleaning up foot traffic. You're cleaning tire marks. When people drive in places, you're cleaning grease stains. If it's at restaurants and you're cleaning just all kinds of crap that just gets basically crushed into the surface. So that's where some of your heavier degreasers come into play. If you're doing something on a residential application, the hypochlorite solution you should be using you can kind of try to target a 2% mix to actually hit the surface with that should be more than enough to take care of any organic growth that's on residential sidewalk. And a lot of times you don't even need like a heavy surfactant because it's truly just organic growth. It's there. It's very rare that you see, you know, gum on a homeowner's sidewalk. It's very rare that you see grease stains all over a homeowner sidewalk, unless it's, you know, the back patio and that's where their grill sitting or something like that. As we kind of move into the commercial side of things. You know, we talked about degreasers and I think this is one of Josh's favorites to talk about.

Josh Lee

So for decreasing and this is might be something I should have dropped in with the stone concrete and walkways. You know, you're, you're cleaning, there's two. Cleaning off of the surface, you're doing more, you know, there's different things that you might have to do to clean the surface. In certain cases it may be cleaning your, a stain where it's actually adhered to the surface where that's where acids coming to. But specifically talking about heavy soils, that's where you need your strong detergents. And our favorite strong detergent is Nastee. And as I always like to say so strong, you can dissolve bodies in it. It has an extremely high pH which makes it break down just about anything that is you know, any oil based, any soil based stain material on the surface. Not so much a stain, but it will also remove stains too because of how strong it is. It's super aggressive and, and has a very broad dilution ratio that can be used effectively to clean the surface. We do sell it for a lot of different cleaning industries. We get it for just commercial buildings, but it's also very popular in the commercial kitchen cleaning applications, lots of dumpster pads walkways, sidewalks, gas stations even very good for spot cleaning to get gum up without having to use heat. So in the absence of hot water, pressure washer Nastee is really good for cleaning that too. So, but once again, it's got a super high pH. You can apply it super strong, but if you're using it in some, some of your softwash applications, you want to know what makes sure you're putting on the surface. You know, you can certainly go full strength, but if you don't want to burn people's plants and certain you know yard work, landscaping, that sort of thing, be cautious with your, with your high pH and very aggressive cleaners. So that you don't hit it to, you know, hit delicate surfaces too that are, that can't handle it.

Josh Wagner

So you mind saying what's in so between Nasteeand Hell Bender and Bitchin' Kitchen, they're probably our most aggressive products. So most aggressive.

Josh Lee

Nastee is a, is a mixture of sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide as well as solvent a degreaser. So it's taking decreasing properties from all of its, all the areas where we find them in the chemical industry. The Bitchin' Kitchenalso using mostly potassium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide seems to work really well o n food-based oils and stains. So that's why it's a great kitchen cleaner. They use it for cleaning the hoods and all that all the aspects of a commercial kitchen. But you even find that for some reason, even if you had the hottest mixture of potassium hydroxide and sometimes you need the sodium hydroxide and the solvent out of Nastee to break down. Like peanut oil in particular is one that Nastee works on better. Then you've got Hell Bender which is just about all sodium hydroxide. Nice thing about sodium hydroxide is it's super cheap. So it's good for just your general cleaning and oil stains and that sort of thing. But the Hell Bender is a neat tool in your toolbox because the sodium hydroxide is also very similar to our stripping agents for wood surfaces. So if you will find yourself, you've got oil stains, but you're also dealing with a lot of decks and a lot of wood surfaces. I would probably lean towards the Hell Bender if I want to have my high pH cleaner for you know, all sorts of applications.

Josh Wagner

So those would kind of be the most aggressive products that you can carry for commercial decreasing. On the other scale of things you have entire eco-friendly lines starting with like I said, my favorite is the Boss. After that we have Power Bolt, which is an industrial grade solvent. That one's awesome for basically cause it's safe for just about every surface. We've got a product called Big Green Bruce and we have another product that's called Orange Potion. I think that one is probably most eco-friendly one.

Josh Lee

It is or the Orange Potion is an orange oil based degreaser. So it is organic. It is biodegradable. It is of course very expensive because it is eco-friendly. We got that great eco-friendly label that always seems to drive the price up. But it also is very concentrated, so it's going to go a great distance that's going to be really good. And also areas where you might have you have to be conscious about human interaction with the surface. So in, in school buses and playgrounds, you know, all around areas where you have a lot of human interaction with the surface that's safer to use so that you don't have to worry about and giving off a bad like really strong aromas that's gonna make people, you know, react to that. And it smells pleasant too. So we got that too.

Josh Wagner

Pleasants an understatement. That one literally smells like oranges when go. Some of the things when it comes to, you know, aggressive versus eco-friendly, a huge thing in commercial cleaning is EPA compliance. And so that's kind of where you fall into wanting the most aggressive product on the market. Nastee to maybe wanting something that's a little more ecofriendly, even though it doesn't satisfy a hundred percent of the EPA requirements. It is. Some of the closest things you can get to being on par with what their level is for a lot of it. And then of course, you know, the more aggressive you go with any of these products like Nastee or Hell Bender you got to keep in mind safety. So every single one of these can do damage to your skin when they're, you know, talking about having sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide, in it, all that stuff is dangerous. All that stuff is something where if you're atomizing it or if you're aerosolizing it you want to have either safety glasses on or you want to have, I mean, at least sunglasses, they do something for you. Same thing with gloves and everything, protecting your skin because Nastee is so strong that one of our customers had to get a skin graft from it. And that's just, that just shows how aggressive it is. And it's not that they're intended to do something like that. It's the target, the, the stain that they're specifically targeting just happens to line up with some of the stains that you know, are our skin. So onto our kind of, our last topic will be mineral staining. And this is where acids really fall into play. This is a huge one because it's the difference between cleaning, it's the difference between sanitizing and restoration work.And what do I mean by that? Well, you can clean the surface, but if there's rust stains there, they're going to stay there. So we have a product that's called Ruster Buster. It's a very solid product. It is a hydrofluoric solution and it's basically used to whatever shouldn't be on the surface as far as mineral staining. You can work on efflorescence, it can work on calcium deposits. If can work on rust, it'll pull it out of the surface. And as long as you dilute it to the right amount, it'll actually basically just remove the minerals staining that's there. So let me elaborate on what you're saying here. So with, with acid removing stains from surfaces, it's actually breaking down a very microscopic level, a layer of the outer layer of the surface that you're trying to clean. So it's not just breaking down the stain, but it's also got to get down to that last layer of skin, so to speak, to remove that stain. And that's why we have to go the direction of an acid versus just some other cleaning agent to break down what's stuck on the surface. Yep. Very true. So we're going to kind of list a couple of ratios here for them. If you're doing something like vinyl cleaning or actually yeah, before I go into that, before you do any kind of rust removal, you have to clean the surface first. It doesn't matter what the surface is, you gotta make sure there's nothing else on the surface of the soil from the surface before you start targeting these specific minerals staining. And that goes the same for calcium and efflorescence too. So you clean the surface, you wait for it to completely dry. And then this is one of those things where you directly apply it just to that area. And you're working specifically to target that one stain. So when you're working with, when you're working using Ruster Buster and just targeting a rust stain on vinyl, you can dilute it up to 50 to 1 and that's more than enough concentration to take rust off of vinyl. When it comes to working your way up, asphalt shingles kind of fall in the next category. You can go up to 30 to 1 and it can still be effective and above that if you're targeting stucco specifically, you can do 20 to 1 and then the hardest surfaces to remove rust from. In my experience, you got stone, concrete and then actual block. When you're cleaning something like that, you can go as aggressive as 1 to 1. And there's some times that just because of how porous the surfaces that it's not going to draw it completely out of the surface, but under the right circumstances anywhere from 1 to 1 to 5 to 1 is a solid ratio for targeting those specific stains on that surface. And that's again, that's just using Ruster Buster. There's a few other products that we carry that'll do the same task, but under ideal circumstances, those can pull usually a good enough amount of the stain off that you're, you're happy with it in the end. The end result is something that you're going for. Now, of course,

Josh Lee

We skipped over one thing we want to talk about when using your high PhD greasers after you're done cleaning a surface you should consider neutralizing the surface for certain applications. In particular, whenever you're cleaning wood surfaces that are very they're not just porous, but they're absorbing the chemicals that you're applying there. So if you're using a high pH detergent to clean a wood surface after you get done, if you're going to re, especially if you're going to recoat the surface, you want to try to return that pH to neutral. So you've, you've got it up there, you know, it's closer to 10 to 12 pH. We want to bring that down somewhere around seven. So that's where you're going to introduce your oxalic acid. You could even in some cases use Ruster Buster as a neutralizer, but we need to use an acid then to bring the pH back down on the surface at the surface before we start to reapply any kind of coating or let it just sit that way. Oxalic acid is the most popular on the, on the wood cleaning side of things. So

Josh Wagner

And one of the reasons you kind of want to do that, we'll just take concrete for example, if you're using something that is so aggressive that it can literally take the pH and raise it all the way up to, what'd you say? The pH of Nastee was?

Josh Lee

A, it's like 13.1.

Josh Wagner

So what let's say somehow you leave so much on the surface that it brings it all the way up there. That surface will actually get dirtier faster. So it doesn't matter how you're neutralizing it, but like you said, you want to bring that as close to seven as you can because if you're not doing something properly, that beautiful sidewalk that you just spent hours cleaning under, I mean I've actually seen circumstances where in two to three weeks of enough foot traffic because it's so out of balance with where it's supposed to be. It will actually attract more staining, more stuff sticks to it and it'll look like crap and like, you know, three, four weeks time, no problems. And I mean another thing that he said, you can balance it with another chemical, but you can also dilute the crap out of it and hope that you're bringing it to a close enough Balance or pH level.

Josh Lee

That is the intent of your, you're getting enough of the detergent off the surface that will help to return it to a neutral. But of course, wood is one of those, You know, as a natural surface, it's a little bit different than, of course, your masonry surfaces.

 

Josh Wagner

Yeah, there's, there's a few exceptions to a lot of these rules and not that you guys have to stick to any of the ratios that we were talking about. But all of this is more of a general rule of thumb for just general purpose cleaning. There's going to be circumstances where you have to go way more aggressive and there's gonna be circumstances where you don't need nearly as much. The key is finding the exact amount of solution that you need so that you're not wasting chemicals so that you're not doing any damage and so that you're just cleaning it and making the chemical process do the work for you as opposed to you physically doing the pressure washing and the work for you. Anything you want to add about ratios before we open it up?

Josh Lee

Mmm, The considerate of the fact that, you know, we will elaborate on this in our next video possibly. We realized that our customers are using a lot of different application methods. So there is a little bit of a learning curve as far as getting, understanding what that means when it, when you're applying it with your chemical injector versus your, your soft wash system versus your X jet. and, so, as you know, in 12 volt pumps, so you gotta kind of sit down and do the math. It's a pain in the neck. We'll try to, elaborate on those formulas as, as we find clear ways to express them as well. But you know, it's, it's, it's a learning curve and, and you should, you should experiment, you know, all of our chemical manufacturers are gonna recommend that you do a test area on the surface before you actually commit to spraying something over the entire surface or, you know, the whole building or the whole wall. So, you know, know what you're spraying up there. And it's okay to start on the conservative mixture side. It's better to start on the conservative mixture side and add the strength as opposed to just starting at full strength because you're gonna be wasting material if you go full strength. You can also certainly damage a lot of surfaces. You know, like I said, Nastee will dissolve bodies. So, anything else that I should. Hmm.

Josh Wagner

Nope, that faster went out the head. I've had I'll come back and I keep, okay. So,

Josh Lee

Mmm.

Josh Wagner

So we should yeah, no, I remember it. It was, it's actually you're saying we can sell you all this stuff to have a cleaning process and make it actually work, but for you to actually use it in a real world scenario and make it work and make it functional and actually profit from it, that's an art and that's something that can't really be taught. That's something that you gotta you gotta fumble through.

Josh Lee

You murdered it.

Josh Wagner

I did. I went a little further. This is my saying,

Josh Lee

Mixing chemicals, science, using them to clean is an art. That that's the saying.

Josh Wagner

I was going somewhere different. Basically going with, you know, the whole practice makes perfect thing.

Josh Lee

Yeah. Yeah. How do you, how do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice. He just learned that this week.

Josh Wagner

I just learned that. Right. All right, so with that in mind, we're going to jump to our first question for the audience. And what I want everyone to do is whatever your answer is, go in and type it in the comments section and whoever gets the answer first will receive a container of Power Bolt. So our question is "Name a kind of cyanobacteria most commonly grown on roofs in the Northern hemisphere." So we did say it once during the seminar. Hopefully someone heard it..

Josh Lee

Fortunately we broke it up. We separated it pretty much. Well, yeah, we didn't want to make it two weeks. It's to see that you're paying attention.

Josh Wagner

Hopefully somebody gets it. But we have any questions from the audience.

Josh Lee

Nathan asked do we sell something that strips and removes deck stain, yes. We have Hell Bender which that was the high pH cleaner. We also have some other strippers. Madame X paint remover, which is it's a commitment, let's say it's a very strong chemical to get any stain off the surface, but Hell Bender is the best place to start. And Nathan, if you need that call me, I'll get, get hook you up with that. As far as lichen that just popped up lichen you can kill with..

Michael Zittel (Off Camera)

These are answers to all of the cyanobacteria.

Josh Lee

Ah, I didn't realize that maybe it should be answered colon. So no algae and lichen are not the answer so far. Good try. Are all well, lichen is technically a cyanobacteria, but that's not the one that we mentioned in our, in the video.

Josh Wagner

Didn't say that one.

Josh Lee

Actually lichen works with the cyanobacteria. It's a symbiotic relationship. So real quick, we should drop in the, the coupon code, right? Yep. What is it that they're getting with the coupon code?mi

Michael Zittel (Off Camera)

$10 off a five gallon bucket of Power Bolt.

Josh Lee

So we're giving $10 off a five gallon bucket of Power Bolt. If you use the coupon code PowerBolt10 and that's no spaces. PowerBolt10.

Josh Wagner

And that code is good for one week. Starting this afternoon on DirtKiller.com [inaudible] So what other the questions we got?

Josh Lee

And still everybody dropping the Lichen

Michael Zittel (Off Camera)

Okay.

Josh Wagner

I like to think that that means that we answered all of your questions during the seminar. Yeah. And we take that as well.

Josh Lee

It is. I mean, technically like it is a type of cyanobacteria. That's all the one that you were going for.

Josh Wagner

That was hurtful. I was, I was really going for the answer Gloeocapsa Magma solely because we like saying that word and it really makes people go, "..what?" So lichen and counts?

Josh Lee

Yeah, it does.

Josh Wagner

All right. Who was the first person to say it. So it looks like Cyn Stern, Cyn Stern.Want to give him one more emails.

Michael Zittel (Off Camera)

Yeah, I'm going to talk to him. Okay.

Josh Lee

Well, algae was a little bit too broad of a term, Michael. Yep. So Cyn, if you hold tight, we're going to have a direct message sent.

Michael Zittel (Off Camera)

Yes. Mmm.

Josh Wagner

Yeah. All right. We're going to have a way to contact you in a minute. And as soon as you reach out, we'll go ahead and get you to we'll ship you something.

Josh Lee

So we should take a second to talk about something that is unrelated to this particular seminar that we set up, which we want everybody know that right now we are open eight to five, Monday through Friday for, you know, just regular business season. There is some limitations that we have of course because of the covid 19 stuff going on. We do ask that everybody wears their masks when they come into the store. We are having limited visits in the actual showroom, but we're trying to be as flexible as possible with that. So we encourage you to call ahead in case you need anything in particular. If you need equipment we'll work to try to demonstrate or at least, you know, look at some of the equipment. But for our customers that are just getting products and tools that we can do curbside pickup, we really appreciate it.If you guys can give us a call ahead for that and we prefer credit card in almost all cases as opposed to cash right now. Just makes things smoother when we're doing our curbside stuff. And technically speaking right now, we are not open on Saturdays. We are going to try to make sure that all the advertising that we have is, is a uniform to that. But if you need something call us ahead of time, ask for one of us and we'll try to make arrangements where we can shop.

Michael Zittel (Off Camera)

You call always shop online 24/7.

Josh Lee

Of course, DirtKiller.com We're doing our best to polish that website as quick as possible.

Josh Wagner

Want to say the coupon code one more time?

Josh Lee

All right. So once more, the coupon code for $10 off the five gallon bucket, which we should tell him that right now is how much I think. No, no, no. Okay. Well you just have to go off of whatever it says on the internet. We'll scratch it. And that was PowerBolt10. Alright.

Michael Zittel (Off Camera)

Also mentioned the Dirt Monkee sweepstakes.

Josh Lee

Oh yeah. We have a Dirt Monkee sweepstakes right now. We're debuting one of our original Dirk Killer lines. And what we're going to do is, if you find us on Facebook, there is a link to enter the sweepstakes. You could win a five gallon a minute, direct drive, pressure washer, and hopefully I believe Mike it is on the same page as this seminar, right? Mike?

Michael Zittel (Off Camera)

Well, it's on the Facebook page,

Josh Lee

See our Facebook page for that.

Michael Zittel

It's also on our website in our blog.

Josh Lee

So Facebook hit book of face website. There you go.

Josh Wagner

Something like that. Anyway, check us out online.

Josh Lee

Don't forget to like, and subscribe.

Josh Wagner

And let's kill some dirt!

 

End.

 

 

 



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